5 Elements of Leadership that Often Fall Short

It’s easy to talk about leadership development as a focus, and to imagine that organizations are filled with great leaders. Unfortunately that’s not always the way it is.  The reality is all too often far different.

Here’s some evidence:

According to an SHRM 2017 Survey, only 51% of employees are satisfied, or very satisfied with their job. A staggering 40% will be looking for alternative employment in the next 12 months.  While people look for openness and transparency within the organization only about one third feel it exists.

Great leaders initiate desired action. They go first. They hold something up as a worthy cause that inspires others’ participation for the greater good. While being the one who sets it all in motion.

Here are 5 Elements of Leadership that often fall short:

  1. When I give my word I always honor it.

People often have good intentions but don’t follow through. Do you actually do what you say you’re going to do? Are you honoring the promises you’ve made to yourself?

  1. I have people’s best interest in mind in every interaction.

Do you demonstrate that you care about the people around you? Are you supportive to their career growth, even if that means you lose them? Will you tell them the truth, even if it’s not what they want to hear but need to hear?

  1. I’m willing to accept personal responsibility for my errors, mistakes and misunderstandings.

Excuses and rationalizations for substandard efforts and performance are far too common. Are you willing to own your behaviors and actions that fall short of desired outcomes?

  1. I believe in full disclosure of all relevant facts and information about myself and anything I’m involved in that impacts you.

Conflicts of interest are often higher than people realize and will admit. Withholding pertinent information that affects people’s lives does not foster an open, high trust environment. How do you initiate trust?

 I receive compensation for my work and I disclose all the ways I receive compensation so that you have a full and complete understanding of what influences me.

People want to feel that they are part of something important, and to understand how their role fits within the organization. Hidden agendas that push people in certain directions for self-interests are surprisingly common.  Are your personal interests aligned with the best interests of the people who report to you?

High turnover, low morale, conflicts, and substandard performance will inevitably continue until there is either a change in leadership personnel, or a transformation in existing leadership.

That transformation is not happening with the current model of leadership development.

People don’t change because they are told to, or because of personality profiles. They change when they are able to see themselves differently, and are given the tools that influence the human dynamics of the workplace.   

Effective leadership isn’t about perfection, it’s about evolution.

What’s the focus of your leadership development?

Connect with me to talk about the human elements that create transformational change.